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Upgraded or Gone? DigiVac Gauge Replacements

Posted by Kerry O'Brien on Sep 2, 2016 9:26:59 AM

Vacuum gauges are like any other piece of technological equipment; they change and evolve over time. One of the primary differences between a new and improved item such as a smartphone and a next-generation replacement vacuum gauge is the naming process. Where many companies can develop new technology, implant it into the new product and give it a name such as HOMETHEATRE X4, a variation of their brand and product name, vacuum gauge manufacturers often don't. Most of the time, digital vacuum gauges are referred to by product numbers and not specific names. Because of this, an upgraded version may be more difficult to determine. Examples of such upgrades that customers have inquired into in the past include:

 

Sometimes You Need a Little Help From Your Friends


All of these changes can be confusing when it is time to order a new gauge! Also, when you go to make an order…you may not be able to find your beloved vacuum gauge. That is when you could use a little help! Your old gauge may have become obsolete and have been retired from our product lines. These changes could be based on the following reasons: older technology components are no longer available or not as accurate as newer technology.

In other words, a gauge is only retired and replaced by an entirely new gauge if it has, in one way or another, become obsolete. Because of this, customers using gauges that have been retired sometimes question whether they need to succumb to an upgrade or not. The answer to this is maybe/maybe not. Unless your instrument is not functioning well for your needs or you need a vacuum gauge that offers better accuracy, you do not need to upgrade.

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New At AVS: OptraVac | Highly Accurate Direct Vacuum Gauge

Posted by Tim Collins on Oct 22, 2015 10:00:00 AM

New At AVS 2015: DIGIVAC—wants your feedback on New Vacuum Technology coming to the market—a prototype is available for viewing and discussion at booth #622, October 18th-23rd, during AVS at the San Jose Convention Center.

People working with high vacuum are met with 2 problems:

1. The vacuum region from 1x10-5 to 1x10-7 Torr requires devices that employ indirect measurement technology such as cold and hot cathode gauges with typical accuracies of +/-  30%, which is considered acceptable. An accuracy range of better than +/- 5% is considered almost unattainable with current measurement technologies

 2. Many academic and industrial processes use a mixture of gasses other than Nitrogen, without establishing an appropriate correction factor, the accuracy of all indirect gauges is compromised

Since most indirect measurement gauges are calibrated in Nitrogen, measuring pressures of different gases with different properties requires a correction factor. Gas correction factors are often based on a particular gas. Therefore, applying gas correction factors for a mixture of known or unknown gases becomes more challenging. This is especially true if the ratio of gasses changes throughout the process.

If there was a solution to these problems, would you want to learn more? Please consider giving us your feedback on a new digital vacuum gauge that avoids these problems by completing a short survey.

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Topics: Manufacturing, Accuracy, Surface Treatment

DigiVac Launches Novel Vacuum Gauge For High Vacuum Region At AVS

Posted by Tim Collins on Oct 20, 2015 1:51:51 PM

DigiVac Exhibiting at the 62nd AVS International Symposium and Exhibition Booth 622

DIGIVAC— is excited to exhibit New Technology at AVS 2015—the 62nd International Symposium and Exhibition on October 18th-23rd at the San Jose Convention Center, in San Jose, California. 

OptraVac |  Addresses the Need of High Accuracy By Direct Measurement in the High Vacuum Region (1x10-3 to 1x10-7 Torr). 

OPTRAVAC is the only Isolated and Passive sensor technology on the market. Unlike any other medium and high vacuum measurement technology currently available, it is immune to electromotive pulse (EMP), electrical interference, and magnetic interference. Why is this important? You avoid sensor degradation and inaccurate readings.

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Topics: Manufacturing, Accuracy, Vacuum Analytics, Surface Treatment

Taking the Guesswork Out of Pumpdown Curves

Posted by Tom Bassi on Sep 24, 2015 11:16:48 AM

Everyone knows that keeping track of your vacuum system pumpdown curves is important and a valuable asset in troubleshooting leaks in the system. However, creating pumpdown curves aren’t always easy and can take too much of your valuable time!

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Topics: HVAC, Vessel Downtime, Manufacturing, Accuracy, Rough Vacuum Systems, Oil and Gas, Transformers, Vacuum Pump Troubleshooting

3 Key Features Your Vacuum Pump May Desperately Need

Posted by Tom Bassi on Sep 15, 2015 10:00:00 AM

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Vacuum Pumps—the Work Horses of Many Industrial Processes

Vacuum pumps are an integral part of many industrial facilities and are used in many chemical processing and manufacturing applications. They are the work horses of vacuum processes and can often be in service 24 hours a day/7 days a week. With proper set-up of your system and timely preventative maintenance, your pump can operate effectively for years to come.

You know how important preventative maintenance is, but there are other features like remote monitoring, data logging for tracking and pump down curve creation, and alarm notification that can be easily added to assist you in keeping your processes running without costly interruptions.

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Topics: Manufacturing, Vacuum Analytics, Vacuum Gauge Connectivity, Oil and Gas, Vacuum Pump Troubleshooting

Avoid False Readings When Vacuum Sensors Fail

Posted by Tim Collins on Sep 11, 2015 11:12:04 AM

 

Ever feel like this guy?

Damage to sensors and units alike is an inevitable facet of field work that can put undue stress on even a well-prepared crew, especially when time is of the essence.

Vacuum sensors are calibrated in air. However, sensor contamination can occur easily in real-world applications leading to failure or false readings.

Having multiple back-up vacuum sensors on hand that have already been factory calibrated to your specific vacuum gauge can save time, stress, and avoid the risk of inaccurate readingsRead on!

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Topics: Manufacturing, Calibration, Accuracy, Oil and Gas, Contamination, Transformers

Vacuum Tips: Beware Of The Pinched Vacuum Hose

Posted by Tim Collins on Aug 19, 2015 2:00:00 PM

 

Industrial Process Troubleshooting: What Is Wrong With My Vacuum Gauge?

Many discussions surrounding vacuum pressure and loss of suction focus on the pump’s deficiencies and leaky chambers, but there is usually little thought or concern regarding another integral part the system’s functionality: the vacuum hose that delivers the suction. Are you sure the hose you are using is vacuum rated? Or, will it collapse under pressure?

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Topics: Manufacturing, Accuracy, Vacuum Pump Troubleshooting